Available OMTs

WebPT EMR offers multiple OMTs to choose from, which allow you to gain a better understanding of your patient and their experience at your clinic. Below is a list of the available OMTs within the WebPT EMR and a brief description of each OMT.

Available OMTs 

OMT Descriptions  

QuickDASH (Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand) 

The QuickDASH (or Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand) is an abridged version of the DASH Outcome Measure. To complete the QuickDASH, patients use a five-point Likert scale to rate the severity of their symptoms and their ability to perform activities within the last week. Responses range from “1” (not at all, no difficulty) to “5” (extremely, unable). Two optional modules are available for patients whose conditions are impacting their work and/or their ability to play a musical instrument or sport. 

Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) 

The Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) is a self-reported outcome measurement tool designed to quantify impairment resulting from lower extremity musculoskeletal conditions. Based on the World Health Organization’s (WHO) model of disability and handicap as well as the most common functional limitations associated with lower extremity conditions, the LEFS is quick for the patient to complete. To complete the LEFS, patients use a five-point scale to rate the level of difficulty that they associate with 20 activities, including performing usual work, housework, and school activities; putting on shoes and socks; and walking two blocks. To each question, patient responses range from “0” (Extreme difficulty or unable to perform the activity) to “4” (No difficulty).

Modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Questionnaire (ODI)

The Modified Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) is an outcome measurement tool designed to assess the impact of low back and leg pain on functional activities. The modified version replaces sexual activity questions with questions about recreation, thus making the tool more applicable to a wider range of respondents. It takes patients three to five minutes to complete the test. To complete the ODI, patients are asked to select their level of disability on a six-point scale for each of ten categories, including personal care, lifting, walking, and traveling. Answers are scored from “0” (no disability) to “5” (complete disability). 

Neck Disability Index (NDI)

As a variation of the Oswestry OMT, the Neck Disability Index (NDI) is the most commonly used self-assessment for measuring the severity of neck pain—in other words, how neck pain is affecting a patient’s everyday life. It’s commonly used when evaluating chronic neck pain, cervical radiculopathy, headaches, whiplash injuries, and associated disorders.

To complete the NDI, patients are asked to select their relative impairment on a six-point scale for each of ten categories, including pain, personal care, lifting, reading, headaches, concentration, work, driving, sleeping, and recreation. Answers are scored from “0” (no disability) to “5” (complete disability).

Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI)

Designed to evaluate the self-perceived effects of dizziness, this self-assessment is relevant when assessing vestibular dysfunction and its impact on balance, gait, quality of life, and social relationships. The 25-item inventory asks patients to assess their level of perceived handicap as a result of their symptoms. Patients should need no more than five to ten minutes to complete the form. All questions are subgrouped based on whether they address physical, emotional, or functional effects.

Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcomes Score (HOOS)

The Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcomes Score (HOOS) is a patient-reported questionnaire that measures the impact of hip problems—with or without osteoarthritis—on an individual’s pain, symptoms, activities of daily living, sports/recreation, and quality of life. Therapists commonly use this assessment with individuals in need of total hip arthroplasty.

The HOOS is a 40-item questionnaire. The score for each item falls on or between 0 (never or none) and 4 (always to extreme). The higher the score, the less disability an individual experiences. 

Modified Falls Efficacy Scale (MFES) 

The Modified Falls Efficacy Scale (MFES) indicates the level of perceived confidence an individual has about carrying out everyday activities without falling. This questionnaire is an expanded version of the original Falls Efficacy Scale (FES), which does not include outdoor activities. Patients rate their confidence to perform daily activities without falling on a scale from 0 (Not Confident) to 10 (Completely Confident). This tool allows a clinician to determine how stable the patient perceives that he or she is, and this will facilitate the clinician’s ability to treat and assess for fall risk. Subjects that have a history of falling and have lost confidence might decrease activity and this decrease may lead to greater impairment and more balance problems.

Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcomes Score (KOOS) 

The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcomes Score (KOOS) is a patient-reported questionnaire that measures the impact of knee problems—with or without osteoarthritis—on an individual’s pain, symptoms, activities of daily living, sports/recreation, and quality of life. Therapists commonly use this assessment with individuals in need of total knee arthroplasty. The score for each item falls on or between 0 (never or none) and 4 (always to extreme). The higher the score, the less disability an individual experiences. 

Bates-Jensen Wound Assessment (BWAT) 

The Bates-Jensen Wound Assessment tool (BWAT) is a standardized, performance-based instrument for tracking wound healing in individuals with pressure ulcers. Therapists should perform this assessment weekly to measure progress in response to the treatment of the wounds. The scores range from 13–65, with a higher number demonstrating a worsening condition of the wound.

Berg Balance Scale (BBS) 

A performance-based instrument, the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) is a widely-used clinical test of a person's static and dynamic balance abilities. Physical therapists and occupational therapists use the BBS to determine the functional mobility of an individual. Named after developer Katherine Berg, it’s considered the gold standard for predicting fall risk. This test is validated for use with individuals who are elderly and/or have a history of stroke, brain injury, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, ataxia, vertigo, arthritis, cardiovascular disease, or respiratory disease. Therapists can administer the BBS before, and at regular intervals during treatment to determine whether the interventions effectively increased the individual’s balance and reduced his or her fall risk. 

The Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) is a patient-reported survey that measures the impact on physical function for individuals with lower leg, ankle, or foot problems. The instrument consists of two surveys that are scored separately: the Activities of Daily Living Subscale and the Sports Subscale. The Sports Subscale is specific to individuals for whom lower leg, ankle, and foot problems interfere with athletic pursuits. Each item is rated from 0 (unable to do) to 4 (no difficulty). A higher score indicates better physical functioning. If the patient answers all eight items, the highest possible score is 32. For every question the patient does not answer, four points are deducted from the highest possible score. For the most accurate results, therapists should only generate scores for the FAAM-Sports survey when patients complete at least seven of the eight items.

Lymphedema Life Impact Scale (LLIS) 

Lymphedema is a condition that manifests as tissue swelling when the lymphatic system fails to remove the excess interstitial fluid. The Lymphedema Life Impact Scale (LLIS) is an 18-item patient questionnaire that measures relevant physical, functional, and psychosocial concerns for patients with lymphedema in any extremity. These qualities of life (QOL) items were developed and revised to be more broadly applicable for all affected patients regardless of life circumstances such as relationship status, employment, etc. The LLIS contributes to the field of lymphedema treatment by offering a condition-specific outcome measure that is short and quick to administer and has demonstrated validity and reliability in the population with any extremity lymphedema.

Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 (PFDI) 

The Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory (PFDI) is a patient-reported survey that measures how much pelvic floor symptoms affect the health-related quality of life of the person filling it out. Three subsections ask questions about urinary distress, colorectal-anal distress, and pelvic organ prolapse distress. Each question is rated from 0 (not present) to 4 (quite a bit). The maximum score is 300 (300 being the worst). The minimum detectable change (MDC) is at least a 45-point (or 15%) reduction from initial to follow-up score. The PFDI demonstrates construct validity because it shows a significant association between appropriately measuring symptom severity and pelvic floor diagnoses.

OMT Calculation Chart

Tool Methodology Range MCID
Bates-Jensen Wound Assessment (BWAT) Sum all answer values. The higher the score, the more severe the wound status. 13 to 65 points 13 points or 25%
Berg Balance Scale (BBS) Sum all answer values. The lower the score, the greater the fear of falling. 0 to 56 points 3 points for multiple sclerosis and 13.5 points for acute stroke
Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) Multiply the number of Yes answers by 4, Sometimes by 2, and add these numbers together. The higher the score, the greater the perceived level of handicap. 0 to 100 points 18 points, or 18%
Foot and Ankle Ability Measures - Sports Subscale (FAAM) Sum all answers, divide by 32, then multiply by 100. The lower the score, the greater the level of disability. Percentage point system from 0% to 100% 9 points or 9%
Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcomes Score (HOOS) For each subscale, the score is then normalized to a 0-100 scale with higher scores equaling better status. The lower the score, the greater the level of the disability. 0 to 100 points 8 points or 8%
Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcomes Score (KOOS) Calculate each subscale score independently: Apply the mean of the observed items within the subscale, divide by 4, and multiply by 100. Subtract this number from 100. The lower the score, the greater the level of the disability. 0 to 100 for the subscores 8 points or 8%
Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) Sum all answer values. The lower the score, the greater the level of disability. 0 to 80 points 9 points
Lymphedema Life Impact Scale v2 (LLIS) Sum all answer values. The higher the score, the greater the negative impact. 0 to 68 points 7.27 points
Modified Falls Efficacy Scale (MFES) Sum all answer values, then multiply by 2. The lower the score, the greater the fear of falling. 0 to 10 points Undetermined
Modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Questionnaire (ODI) Sum all answer values, then multiply by 2. The higher the score, the greater the level of disability. Percentage point system from 0% to 100% 12 points
Neck Disability Index (NDI) Sum all answer values, then multiply by 2. The higher the score, the greater the level of disability. Percentage point system from 0% to 100% 5 points/10%
Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 (PFDI) Scale scores: The mean value of all questions answered is multiplied by 25 for the actual score (range 0 to 100). Summary score: Add the scores from the 3 scales together to obtain the summary score (range 0 to 300). The higher the score, the greater the perceived impact. 0 to 100 for the subscores
0 to 300 for the summary score
Undetermined
Quick DASH (DASH) Sum all answer values, divide the sum by 11, subtract 1 and then multiply by 25. The higher the score, the greater the level of disability. 0 to 100 points 18 points

MCID: The minimal clinically important difference (MCID) is the smallest change in a treatment outcome that a patient would identify as meaningful. If the MCID is met or exceeded, the therapist can be reasonably certain that the patient has made a functional improvement.